Shop Santa Fe, One Fabulous Boutique at a Time

Photo courtesy of Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse
Photo courtesy of Than Povi Fine Art
Photo courtesy of Steve Collins
Photo courtesy of Peter Kahn
Photo courtesy of Nathalie
Photo courtesy of Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery
Photo courtesy of Origins
Photo courtesy of Steve Collins
By Billie Frank, Santa Fe Local Expert

Santa Fe’s a city of unique boutiques. Looking for that perfect pair of hand-tooled cowboy boots, silver concho belt or that drop-dead squash blossom necklace? You’ve come to the right place. Cowboys and Indians meet in Santa Fe where Pueblo people lived over 1,000 years ago and cattle ranches showed up centuries later. The downtown Plaza area, the trendy Railyard District, Guadalupe Street and artsy Canyon Road all have shops and galleries where you can literally shop ‘til you drop. Santa Fe excels in Native American art and artifacts, fine art, wearable art, home décor, tribal art and imports from around the world. The fabulous Seret and Sons, loaded with treasures from the Silk Road and beyond, attracts people so famous the shop has to sign a confidentiality agreement before they show up. On the other end is the fun Jackalope with its acres of world imports or the Traveler’s Market, part museum-quality artifacts, part foreign bazaar. Santa Fe marches on its stomach. There are great food shops waiting to be discovered. Explore the Santa Fe Farmers Market or check out the array of specialty shops for chocolate, wine, gourmet vinegars, spices, foreign comestibles and and distinctly New Mexican ones.

9. Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeehouse
Photo courtesy of Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse

If you love to read and like the feel of an actual book in your hand, you'll love Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeehouse, Santa Fe's largest independent bookseller. Browsers will find a wide variety of both fiction and non-fiction titles for adults, young adults and children. They also have a good selection of books on New Mexico, the Southwest and Native American topics, area guidebooks and maps. In addition, they hold over 300 events a year including author readings and signings featuring both nationally-known and local writers. Their monthly open mic event allows unpublished folks to read their work. There are also opening receptions for artists whose work is displayed in the shop and the occasional acoustic music performance. The coffeehouse, introduced in 2009 when they moved from their original digs on San Francisco Street ,is a great place to rest while enjoying a drink of snack.

8. Than Povi Fine Art
Photo courtesy of Than Povi Fine Art

Than Povi Fine Art is the only large pueblo-owned Native American Gallery in the area. Owners Elmer and Deborah Torres, members of the San Ildefonso Pueblo, a group known for their pottery, first opened a small gallery the on the Pueblo. In 2013, they opened the current location off US 285/84, 15 minutes north of Santa Fe. The importance of authenticity in native art was important to them and inspired them to open the bright, contemporary space. It's filled with the work of over 200 artists; about half are from New Mexico. All the state's pueblos are represented here. Elmer's bow guards and rattles are among the items offered.. Collectors go for the pottery and sculptures, tourists prefer jewelry. On summer weekends, there are Indian dancers and other special activities scheduled. Check with the shop. They also make bread in their outdoor orno (wood fired beehive-shaped oven) three days a week.

7. Traveler's Market
Photo courtesy of Steve Collins

Travelers Market may be one of the best-kept secrets in town. Hidden away at the back the DeVargas Center, it offers over 10,000 square feet of unique finds from forty-three ethnographic and antiques dealers. These intrepid traders comb markets, souks and bazaars around the world for their merchandise. Discover rugs and textiles, tribal and Native American jewelry, masks, pottery and vessels, ethnic clothing, books and thousands of other beautiful and unusual treasures to adorn your body and your home. Ever heard of Nagaland? Harry and Tiala Newfeld (her father was a tribal king of this small Northern India state sitting between Burma and Assam) offer items from their vintage collection of Naga items in their space. Other places dealers tribal source their stock from include Australia, Afghanistan, southeast Asia, Africa, the Middle East, the Americans and Pacific islands. And the best news yet: you don't need a passport.

6. Keshi
Photo courtesy of Peter Kahn

Keshi, subtitled "The Zuni Connection," specializes in art from the Zuni Pueblo in western New Mexico. It began as a co-op founded by Zuni school teachers and artists in 1981. Robin Dunlap was a teacher there and her daughter Bronwyn was in elementary school. Many of the artists they work with today were students and classmates from those days, giving them strong personal relationships with many of the artists they represent. Originally a co-op, the inventory was consigned, today it's privately owned and the shop purchases the art at fair-market prices set by the artists. Over 500 Pueblo artists are represented at Keshi. The Zuni are known for fetish carvings of animas, primarily made from stone. They are often carried on the person as it's believed that the animal's qualities are summoned by these small treasures. They also carry the fetish necklaces and unique silver and turquoise jewelry the group is known for as well as contemporary pottery, paintings and Katsina dolls.

5. Nathalie
Photo courtesy of Nathalie

Santa Fe meets France at Nathalie/Nathalie at Home. Owner Nathalie Kent, a former French Vogue fashion editor, brings her French flair to her Canyon Road shop. Clothing here is a timeless mix of high-end western wear (much of it custom designed by Nathalie herself), and Gaelic fashion. The overall is effect: tres chic! Discover fabulous cowboy boots, Native American silver and Turquoise jewelry, Navajo rugs, textiles, antiques and furniture. Customers from around the world discover a selection of French home furnishings including tables and chairs, lighting; table and dinner ware and even home fragrances. When not out looking for her next unique find, Nathalie is on hand to help you find the right items for the body and the home that you will treasure forever. This consummate fashionista wants her customers to leave with something that will last forever.

4. Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery
Photo courtesy of Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery

Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery has been selling beautiful handmade Native American pottery since 1993. This gallery, with its extensive collection dating to 1850, is THE place for American Indian pottery. They represent artists from all of New Mexico's pueblos as well as the Hopi in Arizona. Also on view are wares from the Navajo Nation, the Eastern Cherokee and the Wyndot people. Shoppers will also find the prized Mata Ortiz pottery from Mexico. Andrea Fisher represents over 500 artists. Discover work from iconic San Ildefonso potter Maria Martinez, her son Popovi Da (pronounced "Day") and his son Tony Da. Pots from Santa Clara legend, Margaret Tafoya are also on view. There are many traditional and contemporary styles to choose from. Don't be afraid to buy. If you change your mind (and you won't) your pot comes with a full, money-back guarantee.

3. Origins
Photo courtesy of Origins

Walk in the door at Origins and you'll feel as if you've entered an exotic foreign marketplace. You'll be greeted by lush fabrics, unusual prints and vibrant colors combining to create an ambiance with a distinctly international flavor. But, look closely at the racks. They're packed with wearable art (the store's main focus) from over 50 American designers, alongside clothing from14 cooperatives from around the world. Many of these ethnic groups draw on ancient techniques and natural dyes that are part of their heritage. Of course you have to accessorize those fabulous finds. Adorn yourself with tribal amber, silver and Turkmen and Tibetan antique jewels or something unique from a local designer. The shop also offers "museum caliber" gold and diamond jewelry. Origins will bring out the gypsy in you.ue jewels or something unique from a local designer. The shop also offers "museum caliber" gold and diamond jewelry. Origins will bring out the gypsy in you.

2. Santa Fe School of Cooking
Photo courtesy of Steve Collins

You'll find more than classes at the Santa Fe School of Cooking. This Santa Fe institution has been teaching locals and visitors how to cook New Mexican cuisine and more for over 25 years. Their chic airy shop is packed full of carefully selected items for cooks. Treat yourself to a culinary souvenir of your visit to The City Different or buy a special gift for the cook in your life. If you want to recreate the local norteƱo food back home, you can get the ingredients here or even buy prepared salsas and other traditional foods as well as herbs, spices and vinegars (just a few of the things on the packed shelves). Discover La Chamba ceramic cookware from Colombia, it goes from oven to table; Nambe Cookware; stovetop smokers; alligator juniper cutting boards from southern New Mexico; table linens and cookbooks, especially those from local authors

1. Seret & Sons
Photo courtesy of Seret & Sons

East meets southwest at Seret & Sons. Walk in the door and you're transported to a foreign bazaar. The Serets spent 15 years in Afghanistan first sourcing lambskin coats for Anne Klein and later working with artisans crafting Seret's original designs for carpet, fabric, and furniture bought by clients like Oscar de la Renta, Angelo Donghia and Bloomingdale's. When the Russians took over in Afghanistan, the Serets moved to Santa Fe and set up shop sourcing riches from Afghanistan, Pakistan, Central Asia, India and Tibet. Discover Seret-designed, one-of-a-kind and mostly locally-made furniture, plush textiles, pottery and other unique treasures. Need an architectural element for your home or yard? The huge backyard is chock-full of both new and antique ones, imported from the Swat Valley on the Afghan-Pakistan border as well as from India. This extraordinary collection was amassed over decades. Come browse, buy or dream on Santa Fe's Silk Road.