Breaking the Rules - Cut Loose in These Less Rigid Vacation Destinations

  • Tango dancers perform in the streets of Buenos Aires

    Dance in the Streets in Buenos Aires

    While it's technically not illegal to dance through the streets of the United States, you might get a few weird looks. In Buenos Aires, however, it's quite common to see couples practicing the sultry tango on street corners. Instead of rock bands, the city's youth form tango bands that play throughout the city.

    Photo courtesy of Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires

  • Nice, France

    Go Topless on the French Riviera

    In general, Americans are skittish about public nudity, but need not be concerned on the beaches of Europe. All along the beautiful coast of the French Riviera, there's absolutely nothing wrong with dropping your top to soak up some sun. Fancy sun bathing in your birthday suit? Many of France's beaches have designated zones for that too.

    Photo courtesy of Bernd Brägelmann

  • Inside the Galaxy Macau

    Play High Stakes ... Really High ... in Macau

    In Las Vegas, you'll rarely find a table limit higher than $50,000, but not so in Macau. This gambling-centric destination in the heart of Asia pulls in five times the annual revenue of Vegas, thanks in part to exclusive VIP rooms where gamblers spend upwards of a million US dollars in a single night, as is the case at the Galaxy Macau VIP room.

    Photo courtesy of Ming-yen Hsu

  • Girls advertise in Amsterdam's red light district

    Hire a Prostitute in Amsterdam

    in Amsterdam, you're legally able to pay a visit to the famed Rossebuurt, or red light district, where sex shops and brothels leave little to the imagination. It also happens to be in one of the most beautiful segments of the city – a place where tourists of all types come to gawk at the girls in the windows.

    Photo courtesy of FaceMePLS

  • 15 seconds exposure of the Autobahn

    Drive Fast and Furious in Germany

    On the autobahns of Germany, you'll find no blanket speed limits for cars and motorcycles, so you're free to put the pedal to the metal. It's not uncommon to see cars whizzing by at speeds of 150 miles per hour, and the occasional high-performance vehicle might even reach 190 miles per hour.

    Photo courtesy of Peter Fuchs

  • Cars can drive right onto the beach in Daytona.

    Drive on the Beach in Daytona, FL

    In Daytona Beach, Florida, you can do what most beach communities would consider unthinkable - drive on the beach.  Just turn down one of the ramps from downtown and you'll be able to drive across the sand to a designated driving area paralleling the Atlantic.  

    Photo courtesy of HumongoNationphotogallery

  • Visitors take to the streets of the French Quarter during Mardi Gras.

    Drink in the Street in New Orleans, LA

    Open container laws are the norm in many an American city, but in the streets of New Orleans, especially in the historic French Quarter, you're free to carry your drink with you as you wander, so long as it's in a plastic container. This lax policy on drinking in the streets comes in handy during the annual Mardi Gras celebrations, when much of the action takes place outdoors.

    Photo courtesy of DoctorWho

  • Grow your own in Amsterdam

    Smoke Marijuana in Amsterdam

    While recreational marijuana use has been legalized at the state level in both Washington and Colorado, tourists have been lighting up in the cafes of Amsterdam for years. In fact, a huge majority of the millions of tourists who come to the capital of the Netherlands annually come for this very reason.

    Photo courtesy of algenta101

  • Absinthe is highly regulated in the US

    Visit the 'Green Fairy' in Paris

    It's now possible to drink certain types of absinthe in the US – those that are thujone-free and make no reference to hallucinations or mind-altering affects on the labels (no green fairies) – but to get the real stuff, you should take a trip to Paris. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, this neon green beverage was a favorite among the crowd of bohemian artists and writers who hung about the city.

    Photo courtesy of Ed Schipul

  • Busy restaurant in Barcelona

    Eat Dinner at 10 pm in Barcelona

    Ask residents of Barcelona what they find odd about Americans, and chances are some of them will mention how early dinner is eaten in the US. In Spanish cities like Barcelona, most restaurants won't even open for dinner until 8pm and don't start getting busy until at least 9 or 10 pm.

    Photo courtesy of Kevin Krejci

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