IndyCar Cities Well Worth a Visit

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    Detroit, Michigan

    'The Motor City' is the most natural destination for any racing series, and the IndyCar Grand Prix of Detroit is no exception.  This exciting race is held on Belle Isle, located in the Detroit River between the US and Canada, and is home to the 983-acre Belle Isle Park.  In nearby Detroit, the Henry Ford Museum beckons all gearheads and car lovers.  Three great reasons to go!

    Photo courtesy of Vito Palmissano - Visit Detroit

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    Baltimore, MD

    Baltimore hosts one of the newest and most intense Grand Prix events in North America. In addition, Baltimore's history predates the American Revolution, so there are tons of historic sites and landmarks such as Fort McHenry. Baltimore's local cuisine is also nationally renowned. Grab a bucketful of Chesapeake crabs, and take in the salt air.  You'll be amazed as you watch Indy cars scream through the streets of the Inner Harbor.

    Photo courtesy of Visit Baltimore

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    St. Petersburg, Florida

    When IndyCar season kicks off in mid-March, there's no better place to host the first race than warm sunny St. Petersburg, Florida. St. Pete is all about the outdoors, and the downtown waterfront has seen a true Renaissance in recent years:  there's a lot to do there.   something that IndyCar fans always enjoy. Plenty of aquariums, seafood, and boating excursions will pique your interest before and after engines roar on the streets of the city.

    Photo courtesy of Visit St. Pete/Clearwater

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    Toronto, Ontario

    The largest city in Canada, Toronto is the destination of IndyCar's single annual trip north of the border. The race is held in the Exhibition Place district, a part of Toronto that sees many festivals and events throughout the year (including the biggest event in Canada, the two week long Canadian National Exhibition). The cultural center of Canada, Toronto is the perfect place to check out an IndyCar race. 

    Photo courtesy of erik_mauer

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    Indianapolis, Indiana

    The city of Indianapolis has, for over one hundred years, played host to the greatest spectacle in racing - the Indianapolis 500 - from which this racing series derives its name. Indy has a reputation for amazing sporting venues and architecture and one could argue that the Indianapolis Motor Speedway leads the way in this distinction with its immense stature and distinctive glass pagoda of its headquarters.

    Photo courtesy of Daniel Morrison

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    Fort Worth, Texas

    Fort Worth's historic Stockyards District has the world's only twice-daily cattle drive, Texas Hall of Fame, saloons, western wear and art, the largest honky-tonk in the world ... need we go on? The city is teaming with historic landmarks and beautiful architecture heavily influenced by the Mexican-American War period in the 1840s.  Fort Worth also hosts the fastest circuit on the schedule: drivers reach speeds in excess of 220 mph at Texas Motor Speedway.

    Photo courtesy of longhorndave

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    Houston, Texas

    For the first time in six years, IndyCar returns to America's fourth largest city, Houston, Texas. The race takes place around the sprawl of Reliant Park, and beyond that lies the beating heart of the modern Texas.  Houston thrills art lovers with its Museum of Fine Arts and the Menil Collection, while baseball fans enjoy seeing Minute Maid Park.  Everybody enjoys a visit to the Johnson Space Center.  

    Photo courtesy of Ed Schipul

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    Birmingham, Alabama

    IndyCar has its roots in the Midwest, but in recent years the series has stretched into new markets with impressive results. Despite its big-city skyline, Birmingham, Alabama still holds onto a fun and lively college town vibe, spurred by its many schools and university facilities. It hosted the first Grand Prix of Birmingham in 2010 at Barber Motorsports park, located on the eastern fringes of the city.  

    Photo courtesy of Tinou Bao

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    Long Beach, CA

    During the 1970s, The Grand Prix of Long Beach was a mainstay of Formula One racing and has since become one of the crown jewel events on the IndyCar calendar. This port city is also home to some of the most luxurious lodging in Los Angeles area, the historic RMS Queen Mary, now a floating hotel.  Long Beach holds the Aquarium of the Pacific, and Hollywood is just thirty miles north.  

    Photo courtesy of California Travel and Tourism Commission/Andreas Hub

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    Milwaukee, WI

    Just west of Milwaukee lies the oldest continuously operating racing circuit in the world: the Milwaukee Mile.   Milwaukee is also famous for its many brewery tours and lakefront attractions. The race is held in the warm mid summer months and has a state fair-like atmosphere, making the Milwaukee IndyCar race an ideal place and time for finding a cold local brew and enjoying the sport of racing.

    Photo courtesy of Praveen Umanath

About Matthew Henson

Matthew Henson is a racing enthusiast living in historic Greenville, SC. Having spent every summer of his childhood going to local racetracks with his grandfather and uncle - both of whom drove race cars they built themselves - Matthew developed a love of NASCAR and all motorsports early on. Several of the major races Matthew has attended are an easy day trip from home.  Greenville lies halfway between Charlotte Motor Speedway and Atlanta Motor Speedway, and in the dead center of the southeastern motorsports network.  

Some people have to search for what they love, but Matthew was born into it. 

Read more about Matthew Henson here.

Connect with Matthew via: Google+


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