This tiny European country is big on beauty

  • Visit Luxembourg's majestic Old Town

    If you have just a day – or even a few hours – on your travels through Europe, consider a visit to the historic and picturesque city of Luxembourg, capital of one of the smallest sovereign states in Europe. The city was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1994 due to the exceptional preservation of its medieval Old Town and the imposing wall that encircles the city, built on fortifications dating from the Roman era.

    Photo courtesy of Joanne DiBona

  • Place D'Armes, the main city square

    The 17th-century Place D'Armes city square lies in the heart of Luxembourg's pedestrian zone and is the main center of activity. Surrounded by numerous restaurants and cafés, it's a great place to sip a coffee, wine or beer and people-watch. If you visit on the second and fourth Saturday of the month, stroll through the flea market. You might discover some vintage gems.

    Photo courtesy of Tony DiBona

  • A shopper's delight

    Despite its medieval roots, Luxembourg is a multicultural and affluent city, and its shopping opportunities reflect that fact. If you stroll along the pedestrian zone, you'll find a variety of high-end designer shops, boutiques with one-of-a kind items and specialty stores that sell everything from handmade lace, exquisite jewelry, delicate porcelain and sinful chocolates.

    Photo courtesy of Joanne DiBona

  • Cuisine for all tastes

    Because it's a center of international commerce that attracts multi-national residents, you can find just about any type of cuisine in a wide variety of restaurants that line the pedestrian zone. For a taste of regional specialties, venture into medieval Old Town and enjoy a meal surrounded by romantic scenes of past centuries.

    Photo courtesy of Tony DiBona

  • Countryside splendor

    Upon your approach to Luxembourg, you'll see endless fields of yellow and green. Depending on the season, you'll be looking at rapeseed, which is used for the production of canola oil as well as for bio-diesel fuel; or mustard greens, which are harvested to mix into the soil as a natural fertilizer.

    Photo courtesy of Joanne DiBona

  • Take home some local artifacts

    If you're looking for a unique souvenir or gift, check out the famous handmade Luxembourg lace. While it's most popular as a tablecloth or runner, you can find it in countless forms (even as lingerie) in specialty stores and in open-air markets throughout the city.

    Photo courtesy of Tony DiBona

  • Changing of the guard

    Make your way to the Grand Ducal Palace to watch military soldiers performing palace guard duty, as well as the ceremonial changing of the guard. This is the official residence of the Grand Duke of Luxembourg, where he performs most of his duties as head of state of the Luxembourg Grand Duchy.

    Photo courtesy of Tony DiBona

  • A monumental city

    Monuments to historical heroes dominate the many squares throughout Luxembourg. This statue is dedicated to the Luxembourg King Charles II who, in the 15th century, ruled over half of Europe.

    Photo courtesy of Joanne DiBona

  • Fast food, Luxembourg-style

    Bistros along the promenade offer the Luxembourg version of fast food; local wine or beer and a crispy helping of pommes frites (aka French fries). Made from scratch, these will definitely be some of the best fries you've ever tasted.

    Photo courtesy of Tony DiBona

  • Somber reminder of America's fallen soldiers

    A short drive will take you to one of the most visited sites in Luxembourg, the American Cemetery and Memorial, resting place for 5,076 American soldiers who fell during World War II. The cemetery was established on December 29, 1944 as a temporary burial ground for soldiers killed in the fighting in the Ardennes, which included the casualties of the Battle of the Bulge. The grave of the famous WWII General George S. Patton, who led his U.S. Third Army through Europe, is also located here.

    Photo courtesy of Joanne DiBona

  • Celebrating peace

    The gilded “Golden Lady” statue on Constitution Square was constructed in 1923 to commemorate the Luxembourgers who perished in WWI. To this day, it serves as a poignant symbol of freedom and remembrance of those who lost their lives in battle.

    Photo courtesy of Joanne DiBona


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