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Chicago restaurants dish up impressive Asian cuisine



Sometimes, the urge to have Asian food strikes, and nothing satisfies until you get it. Whether your craving Indonesian, Vietnamese, Filipino, Korean…or a steamed Chinese dumpling or a bowl of Japanese noodles, you'll find it in Chicago. The city has something for everyone and many of our picks are in Chicago’s diverse ethnic neighborhoods. For authentic Korean BBQ, diners love San Soo Gab San. The late-night, hole-in-the-wall spot is so popular, diners don't mind walking out smelling like they walked through a BBQ pit (because everyone does after dining here).

As you might expect, Chicago's Chinatown neighborhood has great Chinese restaurants such as Ken Kee and Mandarin Kitchen, but the bustling neighborhood is also home to other Asian restaurants we love including Joy Yee’s Noodle Shop which features Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Thai and Vietnamese dishes on its menu.

There aren’t a ton of places to get authentic Filipino breakfast, but those in the know head to Uncle Mike’s Place near Ukranian Village for its outstanding Longaniza, Tocino and Bangus.

Popular eateries like Yoshi’s and Le Colonial remain on the list because Chicagoans love their outstanding food selection and twist on traditional dishes, even decades after they opened their doors. 

There aren’t a ton of places to get authentic Filipino breakfast but those in the know head to Uncle Mike’s Place near Ukranian Village for its outstanding Longaniza, Tocino and Bangus.

Rickshaw Republic, the first Indonesian restaurant in Chicago, is attracting those who love Indonesian street food.

Regardless of your food cravings, if its Asian food you’re seeking, it won’t be hard to find a restaurant in Chicago.


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Ba Le
Photo courtesy of Ba Le


Fans of Ba Le in Uptown and Chinatown rejoiced when it opened up another location in Chicago's downtown/Loop area. Of its extensive selection of Bhan Mi sandwhiches, the Ba Le sandwich's claim to fame is the warm French bread (freshly based at its Uptown location) that keeps diners happy. The original Saigon-style sandwich has a combination of pate, ham, head chees and pork. While the menu heavily leans towards meat options, vegans and vegetarians can dine her happily, too. The vegan papaya salad is full of flavor and the spicy avocado salad rolls are huge and delightly hot thanks to the Sriracha hot sauce.


Most people haven't tasted Filipino food unless they have friends or family but if you find yourself craving for an authentic Filipino breakfast in Chicago, head to Uncle Mike's Place. The Longaniza (sweet anise-wine chorizo sausage) and Tocino (annat and anise cured pork shoulder) can be ordered separately but also together as a combo that arrives with garlic fried rice and two eggs any style. It also serves bangus (boneless grilled milkfish) which is popular among Filipinos. The lugao (soup with chicken, rice and garlic), made fresh daily, is often compared to Greek avgolemono soup, but with fried garlic bits on top. Diners don't come here for the interior nor is this a place for those dieting because the focus is definitely on the ton of food you're served. Aside from Traditional Filipino breakfast offerings, the diner serves regular diner food for breakfast and lunch. Street parking is relatively easy.




East meets West at this Lake View institution. The eclectic menu deftly combines traditional French and Japanese fare but don't expect any sushi here. For example, you'll find spring rolls filled with goat cheese and chicken, and shiitake mushrooms liven up leek and brie tarts. The menu includes a nice selection of vegetarian options such as crispy pizza and handmade pastas. The desserts deserve more than just a glance as well. The place has been around for more than 30 years and even locals say they've walked or driven by and didn't realize from the exterior what an amazing food is served inside. Don't make the same mistake. Stop in and don't be surprised if Chef Yoshi himself comes out of the kitchen to say hello to his diners.


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Joy Yee's Noodle Shop
Photo courtesy of www.parkwhiz.com


Chinatown restaurants can be a bit intimidating for those not familiar with Chinese food. That's why this bright, hip, low-priced restaurant is so popular. The menu is filled with authentic Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese and Thai dishes presented on a massive, photo-filled menu. Good bets are any of the noodle soups or entrees, such as Thai pad woon sen (glass noodles mixed with chicken, shrimp and vegetables), pork buns or chicken satay. Balance that with a fruity bubble tea with tapioca balls. Even if you don't want to trek to Chinatown - Joy Yee Noodles recently opened a few new locations around the city and suburbs.




Every restaurant in Chicago seems to be doing fried chicken these days but Belly Q serves it up Thai style with sweet chili and lime. Belly Q is known for its Asian bbq but also for its fusion of different flavors to create tastes that are uniquely its own. Chef Billy Kim invites diners into his industrial-chic restaurant, which formerly housed a pickle factory, that easily seats 200. Sunday brunch features (you guessed it) fried chicken with Chinese biscuits and pork sausage gravy and tea smoked duck benedict. The Karaoke Den allows guests to belt out tunes using the karaoke player and monitor in the comfort of a 750 square foot private room that features plush, custom-made lounge chairs, side tables, a large tufted ottoman, and acoustically insulated panels.




The menu at Ken Kee's does have some familiar items, like pepper beef in black bean sauce and fruit smoothies. But what makes this restaurant stand out among the others in Chinatown is its unusual menu items. That might mean fried spaghetti and sliced lotus root, pork intestine and duck tongue, or duck chins and goose intestines. So bring your most adventurous eaters, and try something you'd never normally eat (and may never eat again). Or, just stick to the sliced pork and watercress soups, or more conservative dishes, like the beef brisket and turnip, served in a mini wok.


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Lincoln Park


Interesting and tasty Indonesian street cart food, plus free parking and a BYOB policy with no corkage fee? No wonder this place has become such a hot spot in Lincoln Park. Filling a void in Chicago for Indonesian food, Rickshaw Republic immediately gained a following among those who crave traditional Indonesian entrees. Its street food offerings include its popular namesake wings, Rickshaw Wings: fried wings in dry chili, brown sugar and ginger sauce and Pastel: empanadas stuffed with chicken, peas, carrots, vermicelli and boiled egg, served with sambal peanut sauce. Main entrees include the Gado Gado which features steamed mixed vegetables and fried tofu tossed with potato and egg and served with a rich cashew dressing that has diners asking for more. The dessert menu is equally as delicious, with offerings like Es Kelapa (young coconut served with ice and coconut juice).




Fans of this Lincoln Square Korean BBQ joint that is almost open 24/7 do not come for the service. They come for the endless supply of cook-your-own food and experience. Bring a group of friends along, expect to take off your shoes before sitting at the nearly floor-level table and order raw meat for you to grill over fire. Regulars know they can expect a feast with dozens of sides like potatoes, kim chi, seaweed and lotus root that will be scattered around the table for everyone to enjoy. For a group of four or more people, order two sets of raw meat sets and with the sides, you'll have plenty for everyone to enjoy.




Sunda is an award-winning restaurant at the vanguard of America's New Asian movement showcasing Eastern Asian and Southeast Asian regional cuisine. The surprising, simple, flavorful dishes are served and shared while a full sushi bar provides an assortment of sushi, sashimi and nigiri options in a stylish and chic space that includes a main dining room, cocktail lounge and sushi bar. Specialties includes its signature Crispy Rice with Toppings (Hand-Cut Spicy Tuna, Seared Kobe Beef Tartare and Spicy Shrimp Tempura); Crab-Crusted Ahi Tuna with Japanese Hot Mustard Soy Glaze; Malay-Style Chilean Sea Bass with Coriander, Lemongrass, Miso, Chilis, and Curried Cauliflower and Crispy Pata (Confit Pork Shank with Garlic-Foie Gras Gravy and Watercress Salad).




If you're looking for familiar chicken dumplings or egg rolls, this is not your place. Instead, this is a completely different twist on Chinese food - as it's fused with other Asian and Portuguese influences. They call it "Macanese cuisine", and the result are some totally unique and tasty dishes. The signature dish, Arroz Gordo (fat rice) is sofrito rice topped with a variety of meats, including duck, Chinese pork liver sausage, linguica sausage, Macau spicy prawns, clams and a few hard boiled eggs. It's a huge portion, so consider splitting it. Tea lovers should take note of their interesting tea menu, plus don't skip their impressive desserts. This is a tiny restaurant with long communal tables, and it's hugely popular, so expect to wait for a table or be ready to eat at the bar.


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Meet Jamie Bartosch

Jamie Bartosch is a lifelong Chicagoan who thinks her hometown is the greatest city in the world. She is an award-winning newspaper reporter, a freelance travel writer, and the mother of two great kids.

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