Best Shopping



From all the shops and stores in a city, 10Best narrows the options to those places with the most appeal and the best offerings. We deliver a carefully vetted selection to let you explore Galveston shopping on your own. If time is really tight, though, and you don't have the leisure to look through all our offerings, we present our Best Shopping list for Galveston. Here, we distill the best businesses down to a special selection of ten. These places promise a stellar experience and a taste of the city that you just can't miss.



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Airport - Gls


 

Hendley Market offers antiques, such as books and medical equipment, but the real draw is the store's large selection of nativities and santons. Shoppers will find over 200 nativities from far away places like Bethlehem and Germany. The santons, or small collectible figurines often associated with religious themes, come mostly from Mexico.


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For an impressive array of antiques and collectibles, visit this design emporium. The selection highlights the wares of over 50 dealers and includes clothing, jewelry, books, furniture, art, and architectural salvage, largely from the Victorian Age.


8
The Gingerbread House


 

Located in the 1891 Van Alstyne House, The Gingerbread House features 14 different rooms adorned with eye-catching antiques. Items include china, crystal, furniture, and jewelry, as well as Victorian dolls and hats. Since the house itself is an antique of sorts, shoppers can also get a good glimpse of Victorian architecture while they browse.


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Historic cities always seem to have a local artist who dedicates time and energy to capturing the spirit of the city's past. Pam Heidt specializes in Galveston's rich Victorian history, and J. Bangle Gallery specializes in her artwork. Heidt's oils and watercolors are not all that shoppers find, however. The gallery also offers frames and a respectable collection of coins and other antiques.


6
The Strand Historic District


 

A traditional beach-town souvenir shop, Lafitte's Beat presents over 2,500 square feet of gift items, beachwear, and nautical-inspired merchandise. Named after Jean Lafitte, a pirate who lived in Galveston in the early 1800s, the store remains rooted in its coastal surroundings. Shells and local coral are popular souvenirs, but shoppers can also find ship's wheels and lamps. Of course, as in most stores of its kind, you can also buy shot glasses, children's toys, and salt and pepper shakers.


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Airport - Gls


 

Wherever you travel, it's always interesting to see what regional artists are producing. Buchanan Gallery is your best bet for a wide range of contemporary art, including paintings, sculptures, and a variety of other media. Artist openings typically coincide with Galveston's periodic ArtWalk festivals, which are held every six weeks in the Strand Historical District.


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During the 1800s and early 1900s, The Strand Historic District was the most affluent area of town and still features many of the city's upscale establishments. Visitors can choose from one of over 100 shops and restaurants to pass their time, or take a horse-drawn carriage ride to enjoy the romantic charm of the neighborhood. The district plays host to Galveston's Mardi Gras celebration and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1970.


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Mr. James H King began making candy in the 1920s, and his heritage lives on today in the form of La King's Confectionery on Galveston's historic strand. The shop has been satisfying Galveston's sweet tooth since it opened at its current location in 1976. The old fashioned candy shop features a 20s-era soda fountain and more than 40 handmade candies. The shop is famous among locals for its malts.


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The Admiralty on the Strand specializes in nautical-themed gifts and home decor. The always changing inventory includes model ships, stuffed animals, puzzles, pirate- and ocean-themed toys and jewelry. The collection of made-from-scratch model ships by builder Allen LeCornuMaster are also impressive to look at.


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Murdoch's Bathhouse is one of Galveston's most historic locations. The legacy dates back to 1800s, and it has gone through a lot since. The original wooden bathhouse was destroyed in the storm of 1900 and again in 2008 thanks to Hurricane Ike. The newly rebuilt Murdoch's sells beach gear and delightfully kitschy souvenirs.


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