10 Best Restaurants to Enjoy in the Sathorn Area in Bangkok, Thailand



 

Sathorn Road is home to some of Bangkok's best dining. Here, you can literally dine in the stars, enjoying upscale food at some of the rooftop restaurants such as Saffron in the Banyan Tree, or gushing over fine haute gastronomy at the Michelin-starred Thai restaurant Sawaan or Michelin-starred contemporary German cuisine at Suhring. Nearby Urbani  is Bangkok's first truffle restaurant, and you can enjoy these delicacies while overlooking all of Sathorn Road, and if it is fine French you are looking for, head over to Paris Bangkok for some authentic cuisine. Some of Asia's most noted dining is also found here, like Nahm, the Michelin-starred restaurant, and the only Thai restaurant in the world to make the prestigious Restaurant Magazine's "Top 50 Restaurants in the World" list. Also here is the traditional Thai stalwart Supanniga Eating Room, with the same outstanding authentic hard to find Thai cuisine as its same name branch in Thonglor. Elegant Italian is also represented here, and Il Bolognese makes some of Bangkok's most outstanding pasta and pizzas in an elegant setting. For something far less expensive but just as tasty, Baan Som Tam serves up mouth watering Isaan northeastern Thai cooking for a pittance and the crowds packing it each night attest to just how great the food is. Distances on Sathorn Road are not far apart, and BTS Skytrain and MRT subway stations make the area well connected, so you can plan on spending a lot of time dining here with this handy guide.



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Saffron offers upscale Thai dining with one of the most dazzling views to be found in Bangkok. The restaurant and its adjoining Latitude Lounge & Bar, take up space indoors and outdoors on the 51st and 52nd floor of the Banyan Tree. While the epic panorama alone makes Saffron worth visiting, the food is no slouch either. Try the khong wang ruam, the restaurant's signature dish of popular Thai appetizers for two. The set comes with grilled chicken breast satay, fried sea bass rice noodle rolls, banana blossom salad, and crispy rice noodle wrapped prawns, all served with a variety of sweet and sour sauces. The goong yai pad prik gaeng karee saffron is also fabulous, consisting of mammoth jumbo king prawns served in a saffron curry sauce with coconut and potatoes. There are signature cocktails and a good wine list to compliment the food. It's also worthwhile to come a bit early for sunset to watch the colors fade and the Bangkok night come to life from above.


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If you're looking for an evening enjoying the tastes of Paris, Paris Bangkok serves traditional French cuisine, with a gourmet chef preparing Parisienne classics. Paris Bangkok has been a longstanding top French choice for those wanting authentic cuisine, and they recently relocated from Sala Daeng to a far more quiet location in an elegant two-storey home that is slightly hidden just a few blocks from busy Sathorn.

While most French restaurants in Bangkok force you to select an expensive chef's tasting menu, Paris Bangkok offers casual a la carte. Start your evening off with an oyster platter, as the restaurant features a selection of some of the city's best imported French oysters, from the classic Fine de Claire to Marren Oleron and Gillardeau. You can also get your oysters served as a ceviche, or go for traditional starters like frog legs Parisian style.

While there are many standouts here, undoubtedly the absolute highlight of any visit to Paris Bangkok is the entire pressed duck, in which the chef comes out and does a presentation using a traditional duck press, taking out the blood, and then mixing it into a superb sauce which includes rum, cognac, foie gras, and truffle. It's the pi�ce de r�sistance of the evening, although if you come as a couple or group, the large cheese raclette or cheese fondue "Savoyarde" served for two are also well worth a look.

Other highlights include homemade foie gras terrine, Burgundy snails, and a wonderfully photogenic and palate-tingling crab and avocado salad. You'll also want to save room for dessert, as the traditional creme brul�e is a standout, as is the tart Tartin, made with vanilla ice cream and chantilly.

Naturally, Paris Bangkok has an excellent wine cellar, and the dinner can be paired with some superb French and old world wines, such as the excellent Petit Beaujolais Sauvignon Blanc.

For an unpretentious, classy, and authentic French dinner, Bangkok Paris gets everything right, and should be put on your next Bangkok European dining foray.


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The only Thai restaurant to be included in prestigious Restaurant Magazine's Top 50 Restaurants in the World, Nahm now has been awarded a Michelin star by the Michelin Bangkok guide, and in spite of renowned chef David Thompson moving on, still serves up superb fine dining authentic Thai cuisine. The coconut and curry blue swimmer crab is a knockout as is the kurobuta pork with yellow beans, but just about everything is a winner here. If you don't want to splurge for dinner, come for lunch and try the outstanding authentic khanom jeen noodles. Set in an elegant dining room inside of the swank COMO Metropolitan Hotel, Nahm is a must for any Bangkok visit.


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While Eat Me has been around for awhile and is usually accessed by a side alley on Silom Road, it is actually just off Sathorn and remains one of the neighborhoods most innovative eateries. The restaurant is both an art gallery, featuring monthly exhibitions, and a dynamite international fusion kitchen, serving up treats like black truffle and risotto or rabbit ragù, and the restaurant has been listed as one of Asia's top 50 restaurants amongst other accolades. There is live music, a dining room surrounded by bamboo, and a very relaxing vibe to be found here. A stalwart on the upscale and sophisticated Bangkok dining scene, Eat Me is a great spot to chill out in and eat some dazzling food.


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Urbani Truffle Bar and Restaurant, perched up on the 39th floor of the Sathorn Square building, occupies a superlative piece of real estate, facing the Bangkok skyline and boasting large windows from every table from which to look out on the city. Given the lofty position the truffle occupies on the food chain, it's a worthy pairing.

The Urbani family is legendary, dating back six generations and controlling over 70% of the world truffle market, with shops in 68 countries around the globe. Here at their first and Bangkok's first restaurant dedicated solely to the truffle, diners are treated to a variety of five-course tasting menus in which they get to design their own dinners, choosing between an array of courses that all show off the fragrant imported truffles. The finest quality meats and seafood are used here, from Japanese Kobe beef to imported Spanish sea bass, halibut, or Australian tenderloin, all beautifully presented on creative plates in which the truffles have been grated, topped, or weaved into.

If you happen to be here during the fall season, when the prized white truffle becomes available, make sure to sample it, served best here in a homemade tagliatelle carbonara, served with sous vide egg yolk, bacon, and white truffle slices. As they don't shave the truffles at your table, it's worth asking to go up to the open chef's kitchen to watch the truffles being grated under bright lamps just before they are served. The earthy and pungent aromas and flavours of the truffles are released by the heat of the pasta, tasting heavenly enough to justify their Italian nickname of the "truffle of the white Madonna."

Chef Toey Saharat Tangthai heads a large team of cooks here (the lineup needed to create the outstanding and meticulous presentations is quite impressive), all of whom are visible in the bright open kitchen. Chef Tangthai is a young (33) rising star, who already has stints at two Michelin-starred Gaggan and Mezzaluna under his belt, as well as the Skye Beach Club at the Laguna, Phuket, before taking over as the Group Executive Chef here at Urbani.

In addition to the tasting menus, you can also opt for a la carte, and Urbani also serves a small lunch tasting menu for those who want to sample the wonders of fresh truffles without going all out for a dinner splurge.


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Isaan, or northeastern cuisine, is probably the most common food eaten in Thailand, by both visitors and locals alike. Some of the best Isaan food is found at corner street stalls, which most tourists find too hot and uncomfortable to sit at, whereas the food in fancier digs often leaves a lot to be desired. Baan Som Tam creates a very happy medium with fantastic fresh northeastern cuisine in a homey air-conditioned environment. The sai krok spiced sausages made with sticky rice are superb here, as is the namesake papaya salad (som tam), with all of the ingredients tasting so fresh and flavor packed you will think they are organic. The restaurant was given a Bib Gourmand award by Michelin due to its great value delicious food.


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Thomas and Mathias Suhring are identical twins as well as master chefs. They have converted their beautiful old villa home in Bangkok into an intimate garden restaurant where they serve German and European fare inspired by their childhood memories and family recipes. Upgraded from one to two Michelin stars in the 2nd edition of Michelin Bangkok, the restaurant is comprised of a winter garden glasshouse, which looks out at the garden, along with a "living room" elegant dining area, as well as the kitchen, where diners can sit at a chef's counter and watch the 9 or 12 "Suhring Experience" set menu be prepared. There are also a la carte standouts like spatzle, a southern German egg noodle dish served with black truffle, or Himmel und Erde (Heaven and Earth), made with crispy potatoes, black pudding and green apples. The tasting menus run from 3000 baht and upwards.


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You might forget that you are in Bangkok after an hour of dining at this stellar Italian eatery, the food certainly is divine enough to make believe that this really is Bologna. Hidden down a quiet side street and located in a comfortable old home, Il Bolognese just might be the best Italian restaurant in town. It's a full on professional dining experience on all levels here, from the manager constantly coming around to tables to check on diners' experiences, to the free palette cleaning sorbets to the free shots of limoncello to top off the meal. The wood fire oven pizzas here are sublime, with creations like gorgonzola and speck using fine imported ingredients. The burrata cheese plates are melt-in-your-mouth-watering orgasmic, and the pastas are all painstakingly hand made. The entire experience from setting to food is romantic and elegant, and this is a top notch place to impress a date or go out to celebrate a big event. It's not cheap, but compared to neighboring spots that serve far inferior food at inflated prices, it is a steal. Highly recommended.


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Restaurateur extraordinaire Thanaruek Laoraowirodge continues to keep traditional Thai food on the Bangkok gourmet map with his latest opening in the trendy Soi 10, Sathorn's rapidly rising equivalent of Thonglor. With the same name and same menu as Supanniga Eating Room in Thonglor, you won't get too much different here than the other branch, other than a much closer venue for those staying around Silom, the Chao Phraya River, or Sathorn, along with a more modern and upscale decor, but rest assured that the food and drinks are just as fantastic as the east side location. Supanniga Eating Room focuses on traditional Thai recipes from Laoraowirodge's grandmother, a native of Trat, on the eastern seaboard. Make sure to order the moo chamuang, a stewed pork stew dish made with leaves from the Guttiferae tree and Thai herbs, so tender and flavour filled that you'll be begging for more rice to soak up all the juice. Also worthy of high praise is the khao krieb nam jim, steamed flat rice noodles with spicy dried shrimp dressing. The restaurant boasts a special crab menu with treats like gaeng bai poo cha plu, crab meat and roe in red curry with cha plu leaves, and there is also an extensive signature cocktail menu to pair up with the food. It's a great place for a date, or to impress those who want to taste quality, authentic, and traditional Thai food in a cool setting.


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There's a reason why Saawaan has been awarded a Michelin star by the prestigious Michelin Bangkok guide. Yes, the name of the restaurant means "heaven" in Thai, and yes, you are going to feel closer to the stars after a meal here, but you also can count on an intimate fine dining experience that features authentic and creative Thai cuisine that is simply some of the best in Bangkok, prepared by a wildly talented chef.

Saawaan's 10-course tasting menu is divided into dishes that represent all of the concepts and techniques found across the board in Thai cooking. You'll get to sample raw, fermented, dip, boiled, grilled, stir fried, curry, and sweet here, and the fun starts before you even get to the menu. The complimentary starter, an amuse bouche of "kai luk koei," a sous vide egg served with cream, tamarind sauce and chili oil, that comes served as if in a bird's nest. It's small and delicate, but packs such a wildly wonderful array of flavours, and sets the tone for what lies ahead.

Chef Sujira "Aom" Pongmorn, who runs a skilled kitchen team, has an incredible knowledge of Thai cuisine, and has put in time with some of Bangkok's most noted dining establishments, such as Sra Bua, Issaya Siamese, The House on Sathorn, Lord Jim at the Mandarin Oriental, and more recently running the show at the Michelin Bib Gourmand-awarded Baan Padthai. Here at Saawaan, she showcases regional dishes found at street level that have been elevated to some of the most delectable tastes you'll find across the country.

Take the "nam pu ma", served as the "dip" dish. This comes from rural Thailand, where farmers would make grilled paddy crab fat into a "nam prik" chili dip and eat it with sticky rice. Here, Chef Pongmorn has mixed the paddy crab fat with Thai herbs and grilled them in the crab shell, and it gets served with coconut steamed sticky rice.

Another total standout is the "gai kati khao luem pua," a chicken curry in which free range chickens from Nakhon Pathom are flavored with a Central Thai curry sauce and served with pineapple and bamboo shoot, alongside of what is known as "forget the husband" rice, so called because it is so good that the housewife serving it would forget her husband was also at the dinner table while she was eating it! From presentation to the creamy curry and perfect spice balances, this is the final course prior to dessert, and pretty much sums up the entire experience here, one of total dining bliss.

You'll also want to leave room for dessert, as Bangkok's most noted pastry chef, Arisara "Paper" Chongphanitkul, a graduate of the French Gastronomicom culinary school, lends her expertise to the sweets here, serving up pumpkin and coconut custards alongside of durian-flavored chocolate petit fours to close out the evening.

Add to this Bangkok's best wine pairings to be found, attentive service, and the intimate surroundings, which feature just six tables, dim mood lighting, and an open kitchen, and you've got all the trappings of one unforgettable "heavenly" evening.


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Meet Dave Stamboulis

Dave Stamboulis is a travel writer/photographer based in Bangkok. Born in Athens, Greece and growing up in the U.S., Dave first discovered Bangkok while on a 45,000-kilometer bicycle trip and...  More About Dave

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