by Kae Lani Palmisano for USA TODAY 10Best

Make your New Year luckier with these dishes

In cultures across the world, what we eat can help determine the good fortunes the New Year will bring. So if you’re looking for a few ways to bring good luck into your 2021, here are 10 foods you can eat.

Black-eyed peas

Alone, the peas represent pennies, but when served with greens (representing dollars) and cornbread (representing gold), the trio is said to bring a bounty of wealth into the New Year.

Pork

Enjoying a pork dish on New Year’s Eve (or New Year's Day) is said to bring progress, because pigs are always moving forward. It’s a tradition held by many Western cultures, including the Pennsylvania Dutch and Germans, who pair pork with sauerkraut.

Soba noodles

In Japan, Toshikoshi soba noodles represent a long life and longevity. The length of the soba noodles symbolizes a long life, while the buckwheat in the flour brings resiliency into the New Year.

Pomegranate

In Greece, there's a tradition where pomegranates are smashed against the front door to bring good health and happiness to the home. Throughout the Mediterranean and the Middle East, pomegranates are a sign of fertility and abundance.

Ring-shaped desserts

Around the world, enjoying ring-shaped cakes, donuts and other pastries for New Year’s Eve symbolizes the year coming full circle.

Sauerkraut

Because of its green color, cabbage is associated with luck and fortune. So for many Eastern Europeans, Germans and the Pennsylvania Dutch, eating sauerkraut is said to bring good luck and wealth.

Kransekage

Throughout Norway and Denmark, the Kransekage is the centerpiece of the New Year’s Eve dinner table. Paired with champagne, this wreath cake tower is constructed of marzipan and topped with icing, chocolate and sometimes nuts.

Tamales

Making tamales is a communal process, bringing together family and friends to each take charge of one aspect of the dish. Tamales are also made in large quantities and shared with loved ones, making it a common meal to enjoy for the holidays.

Oliebollen

Champagne may be fancy, but the effervescence and tartness of it pairs perfectly with oily, fried foods, including the oliebollen, translating to "oil balls," in the Netherlands.

Round fruits

There are several ways to take part in this New Year’s tradition, but for the most part, families display a fruit basket bearing 12 fruits on the dining table, and at midnight everyone either eats 12 grapes or takes one bite out of the 12 different fruits.

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